Artist’s Journal: NUMBER 51

“Painting is self-discovery.

Every good artist paints what he is.”

Jackson Pollock 1912 – 1956

Drawing: B-Series – 1- 2013 MEDIUM: Graphite, charcoal, dry pastel and colored pencil and, cellophane tape on Trojan Onionskin Typing Paper. SIZE: 76.5” x 88”
Drawing: B-Series – 1- 2013
MEDIUM: Graphite, charcoal, dry pastel and colored pencil and, cellophane tape on Trojan Onionskin Typing Paper.
SIZE: 76.5” x 88”

I wonder as I wander.  Yesout under the sky.

In my quest to answer why I do what I do, I have turned to those who came before me.

Wassily Kandinsky is one painter I have “consulted” and he “said to me” something similar to Don Wilkinson’s review of my last show.

Don wrote that,  All of the work is presented without any real title, only series of numbers and letters, and nothing to suggest any connection to any other than the ephemeral. 

This is not to suggest that Fortier’s work is without restrain.  He lets the chaos out but contains it within orderly borders and invites the viewer to climb the fence.

Oddly, Kandinsky wrote in 1913 that, “I have for many years searched for the possibility of letting the viewer “stroll” in the picture, forcing him to forget himself and dissolve into the picture.”

Don’s reference to inviting “the viewer to climb the fence.” came to mind.  In the same 1913 essay written in Moscow, Kandinsky wrote, “It took a very long time before this question (What should replace the object?) received a proper answer from within me.”

“Often I look back into my past and am desolate to think how much time I took for the solution.  I have only one consolation: I could never bring myself to use a form which developed out of the application of logic—not purely from feeling within me. ”

“I could not think up forms, and it repels me when I see such forms.  All the forms which I ever used came “from themselves,” they presented themselves complete before my eyes, and it only remained for me to copy them, or they created themselves while I was working, often surprising me.”

“…I have trained myself not simply to let myself go but to bridle the power working within me, to guide it.  With the years I have understood that working with a pounding heart, with a straining breast (and thus aching ribs later), and with tension in my whole body cannot suffice.”

“It can however only exhaust the artist, not his work.”

Time to let some more chaos out!

Posted on: 21/03/2013, by :
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